Behavior Management

I'm stumped for ideas...I feel like I've tried everything and hit a wall.  What's your best behavior management techniques for individual children?  Leave a post below and share your knowledge! I bet there are more people than just me that could use some help!

12 comments:

  1. Have you seen the clip chart? The clip chart is divided into 7 colored sections and each day you will start out on green, in the middle. Good choices will enable you to move up on the clip chart and poor choices will cause you to move down.
    CHeck out www.bainbridgeclass.com and look under rules and procedures. It's wonderful

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  2. I use a stoplight ticket system. My principal supports the program. The kids move their stick to yellow and then red when inappropriate behavior presents. Each day the kids go home with a ticket... green, great! yellow.. think! Red... STOP this behavior!
    christy.inglis@sendit.nodak.edu

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  3. I build rainbows for GREAT behavior. check out the link to read more about the procedures of it. It has worked wonderfully for my students. They love completing their rainbow and work really hard to finish it. http://mrsleeskinderkids.blogspot.com/p/rainbow-system.html

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  4. I am anxious to see the responses to this post...this year...I have a challenging class...so I can't wait to hear good behavior management ideas. I use the clipchart in my class...but I have 2 special students that aren't quite ready for this type of system (it just doesn't work for them)...so I'm looking for any other techniques that I might be able to use with them...:)

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  5. http://putyourwholeselfin.blogspot.com/2010/08/b-is-for-behavior.html
    This post explains my system. I have a How was your day chart - when a rule is broken the child puts a picture icon of that rule in the pocket- they stand at the chart and practice saying the rule 3 times. Then I watch for the student to practice the rule they broke (raise hand, share, listen...) after I have seen the child pratice the rule ( a few times) they can put a purple card in their pocket and the consequence (note home) goes away. I also am using this with a student right now that needs more then a behavior folder home at the end of the day. http://www.slideshare.net/LuanneVirginiaLewis/hayden-goal-5611634

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  6. I have a few different things going on in my room, but my main behavior management system is kind of like the color chart {only it's Hollywood themed}. Each day, my kids start out on the red carpet. If they make a sad choice, they move their clips to a Take 1! clapboard. There are 4 clapboards and the 4th one {CUT!} is the one they avoid like the plague ;) During the day, the kids can earn tickets to shop in my concession stand, so that keeps them pretty motivated. They can also earn Oscars for outstanding behavior & they really try hard for that, too :) Here's a little sneak peek into my behavior management: http://thefirstgradeparade.blogspot.com/2010/08/behavior-management.html

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  7. Individual behavior management varies with each student and his or her specific context and needs. Number one, even for individuals, is to set whole-class expectations (voice level, walking in line, materials management, etc.) and stick to them. I introduce, model, and have students practice expectations for the first few weeks of class, even if it seems they've already 'got it.' The continued practice cements those expectations into students' muscle memory. We then stop and review/practice the expectations whenever needed, on a whole-class, small-group, or individual level. Always let the students know you are watching and remind them of the expectations as necessary. If further measures are necessary for a student, we have a conference and set a behavior contract with 2-3 goals. We both sign the contract and ask the parents to sign also, which lets the child know that parents and teachers are in on this together. We often use a daily behavior chart which is broken down into content areas or half-hours. The student's goals are written (and picture clues are added) at the top. The student picks if the chart will be taped to his table, my table, or somewhere else, but it's always where the child can access it. The child is responsible for keeping the chart filled in, upon quick consultation with me--it teaches the child to be responsible for his behavior (and rewards).
    This comment has gotten very long, so I'll stop here. I have been very busy with other responsibilities this year, but will add a note to post about behavior management on my blog soon...

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  8. I really like "classroom management" strategies by Rick Morris. He has some really good ideas. Check out his website: newmanagement.com. He has downloadable files and a good behavior chart under Quick Links :) good luck!

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  9. thanks for the tip! I'll check out that website!

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  10. I have a sentence strip for each child with 5 velcro dots. Above the 5th velcro dot I have the word prize. On the sixth velcro space is a smiley face. As long as they are behaving, making good choices, etc. they stay on the smiley. If I've had to correct a lot then they move to a straight face (there are also frown faces with consequences).
    At the end of the day, if the child is still on his smiley face, then he can move his bee (I'm using cut out bees with the kids names on them this year) one velcro space closer to prize. When they reach prize they can choose something from my prize box. If they are not on a smiley, they do not move up that day, but start the next day out on a smiley face.
    I hope this made sense! It works so well in my class. There are both long term and short term goals involved and it is a continual system, not something that just lasts for the week.

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